Classical Kids Collection

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Druanna

  • Reviewed on Saturday, May 7, 2016
  • Grades Used: Kindergarten
  • Dates used: 2015-2016
I LOVE THIS SERIES! I listened to them as a kid and it's how I learned the names and recognized the music of some of the greatest composers in history. There are 8 CDs in the whole collection, each containing a fictional story about the composer set to their music.

Here's how I used it for my child's K curriculum: I would find basic picture books for the composers at the library; we would read and learn about them throughout a one to two week period; then, at the end of the week, I'd let my child listen to the CD story. It's a fictional story of the composer set to the music they wrote. My child loved it. Handel was her favorite and now, when we go to the grocery story, she pretends to be a soprano and sings bits of the 'Messiah' to other shoppers. Lol

TeriTrent

  • Reviewed on Saturday, October 17, 2009
  • Grades Used: 3rd and 5th
  • Dates used: 2009
Just a warning. The first CD in this collection that I listened to was Mozart. It is highly annoying. They sing through the music and the dragon is constantly whining and feeling sorry for himself. Furthermore, the whole story is about finding this man's true love. It's just really annoying. I almost want people to get it just so they can share in my pain.
Vivaldi is really good for the most part. There is no irritating singing. Just the story with the music in the background. The only problem I had with this one was when a male character told the little girl that bad girls spirits turn into ravens when they die. Then he did this creepy laugh. They talk about the dead and spirits, so if your kids are sensitive to scary things, they won't like this.
My son is 12 and he even said the Beethoven CD is a little creepy.
Overall, I don't mind the CD's. I wouldn't say they are the best way to learn about the composers but the only one I'd like to break in half is Mozart.

Brandie

  • Reviewed on Wednesday, September 16, 2009
  • Grades Used: 2nd-3rd
  • Dates used: 2009
Here's a mixed review. Yes, the child can learn a little about the masters. But, they do have their problems. The Mozart one hardly mentions Mozart's life, but does take the Lord's name in vain over and over. The Bach one starts with a little girl argueing with her mom, and then stomping away and slamming the door. The rest of the CD is good, but I recommend skipping the first track. I did like the Beethoven one a lot.

Debra High

  • Reviewed on Thursday, February 6, 2003
  • Grades Used:
  • Dates used:
I was driving down the road one day listening to NPR and there was an interview with the woman who wrote and produced all of the Classical Kids Collection Tapes. They were playing an excerpt from her tape with the lullabies (right now I can't think of the name of the tape because all my CKC tapes are at our other house-we've just moved). Pachelbel's Canon is on the lullabies tape and as I listened to snatches of the this tape on the radio I suddenly realized that the song Seek Ye First the Kingdom of God is done to the tune of Canon in D. I never knew that before.
Well, anyway, being the classical music buff that I am and determined that my children would have a steady diet of classical I went right out to Classical Westport in Kansas City, MO and bought all of the tapes.
The lullabies tape is beautful. Pachelbel's Canon is interwoven through all the music. Mr. Bach Comes to Call is about a little girl who's supposed to be practicing the piano and she gets a visit from the master himself. He tells her all about his life and of course you hear some fantastic music. The tape about Vivaldi (The Ring of Mystery) is about a little girl who ends up at the orphanage where Vivaldi taught music to orphan girls. At the end she makes an amazing discovery about who she is. Hear about Tchaichovsky (right now I cannot spell his name) visiting America. The tape about Handel is very beautful. The music is superb. A deaf boy suffering due to his mother's death is able to sing beautifully. In Mr. Beethoven Lives Upstairs, listen in as a boy writes letters to his uncle(?) as he learns to appreciate his mother's cantakerous tenant.
These tapes are an excellent way to give your children an appreciation for the classics. You know you've done something right when your 15 year old son listens to your favorite classical CD's on his headset.

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