Landmark Bible Curriculum

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Em & D's Momma

  • Reviewed on Friday, September 21, 2007
  • Grades Used: "3"
  • Dates used: 2007 -
Scroll down for a full review...

We ordered this worktext for my eight-year-old daughter to use in independent Bible study. We take an eclectic approach to education - real books, lapbooking, worktexts...

With that in mind...

Is it age appropriate? Yes.

Size? Conventional spiral-bound worktext, teacher's answer key, quizzes and quiz key.

Number of lessons/pages? 36 weeks, 5 lessons each week.

Easy to use? Very.

Explain how a lesson is supposed to be conducted? Child uses the worktext and a King James Bible to complete five days of lessons, with a short memory verse and quiz on day five.

Explain how a lesson actually runs in your home. My daughter works on her lesson every morning before our directed studies begin. We do not utilize the quizzes, but I do review the material with her daily to ensure she comprehends and understands what she reads.

What is covered? Systematic study of the Bible - in this case (B115) she is studying "New Testament Characters."

Illustrated or not? Quality of illustrations. Yes - though not lavishly. The illustrations and text are simple and straightforward.

Is cutting and pasting involved? Not unless you add to the curriculum.

Did your student learn? Enough? So far, so good.

Does your student enjoy using the product? - Is the price in line with what you receive? Yes and yes - for about $40, you get the full package. I could do without the answer key and quizzes, but this is produced by an independent Baptist church, not a major curricula mill. That plays a big part in the price, I'm sure.

Consumable, workbook, software, hardcover, softcover, spiral.
Consumable, softcover, spiral-bound worktexts.

Its approach (mastery, spiral, unit study, hands on). Mastery.

Activities driven or read the book then answer the questions? Read the book or text.

Teacher's guide/key necessary or not? Tests available? Necessary? I don't find it necessary in this particular grade - probably helpful in the upper levels. Also, depends on YOUR knowledge of scripture and doctrine.

Religious, secular, or multi-use, amount of religion in each subject. Fully religious - obviously. Some leading of the child in the text as opposed to allowing the child to make logical conclusions.

Are copying rights conferred for single classroom? Don't know.

Is it teacher led or done independently by the student? Independent with teacher "sign off" on scripture memorization and quizzes.

Quality of materials. Has it held up under heavy use? Very good.

Is using it overall a positive experience? Yes.

Now for my opinion...

This program is published by a local, completely autonomous and independent, fundamental Baptist church in Florida. LFBC does offer complete curricula for grades 1-12, using a worktext approach that is similar to "traditional" school model of texts and workbooks, as well as an umbrella program wherein parents send coursework to them for grading.

LFBC's Bible (B115) New Testament Characters is recommended for grade 3. Again, we do not follow the traditional age-based "grade" model, but I decided to take a chance after reading the item description and viewing pages on CBD and the LFBC Website.

The worktext consists of 36 weekly chapters, each divided into five daily lessons. For example, Week 1 is "John, the One Jesus Loved." On "Day One" the student defines five words or phrases (in this case - betray, love, troubled in spirit, beckoned and bosom) using the glossary at the back of the worktext. The student then reads John 13:21-25 in the King James Version.

Week One, Lesson 2 consists of text that expands on the Bible reading and makes a practical application to the Christian walk and ends with a matching activity for the five vocabulary words and six questions that pull from the text and allow for more subjective answers - i.e., one question asks "What makes Christians stronger?"

Lesson 3 requires the student to answer three questions - "How do we get closer to Jesus?" "Do you think God is pleased with our second best? Why?" and "How should we be like John in serving Christ?"

Lesson 4 directs the student to copy John 13:23 and memorize it. I believe we will memorize the entire passage instead, working every day. Emily (as well as most children at this age and younger) is quite capable of memorizing lengthy passages of Scripture. Five verses should be a fair task!

Lesson five is a weekly quiz - included in the complete subject set. The child is given six open-ended questions and required to "write John 13:23 in your best handwriting."

Included in the package are the student worktext, quizzes and answer keys for both.

We ended up dropping this program about 12 weeks in, however, as I didn't care for the "independent Baptist" mentality of the program.

If you are anything OTHER than an IFB, you probably won't like it!

Liz Valyi

  • Reviewed on Monday, October 7, 2002
  • Grades Used: Kindergarten
  • Dates used: fall 2002
I am not a seasoned homeschooler, so the step-by-step approach taken in introducing not only my son but myself as well, was well received. The program is wonderful. It has built my confidence in continuing to teach my child. It feels so natural.

I find however, the Math in the kindergarten curriculum - weak. The curriculum is still introducing numbers and their values. I think it needs to include addition, subtraction and practical uses for numbers (thermometers, fill-in-the-blanks, or connect the dots). We've supplemented the math in the program with a McGraw-Hill Kindergarten Math exercise book. It has made applying numbers fun.

Our family is enjoying the Bible memory verse program. I am amazed at how quickly my son has memorized and understood God's word. What a security to know my son is receiving the education which most pleases God. Teaching our son about God's truths.

Debi Dodson

  • Reviewed on Saturday, July 28, 2001
  • Grades Used: 10
  • Dates used: school year 2000-2001
I had originally used Life-Pac curriculum for my daughter, Andrea. Although adequate, it didn't deliver everything I wanted for a high-school curriculum. I switched to Landmark in three subjects in order to evaluate its capacity and was satisfied beyond my expectations. Other than tenth grade history covering the history of the Baptist church, the curriculum is sound, well researched and adequate enough for a high schooler to work on her own. It is my opinion that any pre-packaged curriculum be augmented by other assignments, but Landmark offered a well rounded beginning for the topics covered. I will be adding other Landmark courses to Andrea's work for 2001-2002.