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Happy 500 anniversary!

Happy 500 anniversary!

Today is the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s 95 Theses. what do you think life would be like today without the Reformation?

I think eventually knowledge of the masses would have bent the Catholic Church into what it is today anyway, but, it would have taken much longer. What is your guess?

re: Happy 500 anniversary!


I'm so glad you mentioned this. :) Our church had two awesome services Sunday, celebrating the Reformation. The whole month has been a celebration of the Solas.

The Reformation was not just about Luther. It was about the people of the Lord returning to God's Word as their absolute standard of Truth, and extending the invitation to unbelievers to repent of sin and receive salvation. One big emphasis was the truth of what God's Word says about how people can be saved. Salvation is not incumbent upon priests or sacraments; it is a free gift, as seen in Ephesians 2 (and Romans and Galatians, indeed throughout the NT).

William Tyndale was another huge figure in the Reformation. He was English, spoke at least seven languages, and had to flee to Germany in order to translate the Bible into the language of ordinary people so they could read God's Word for themselves. IMHO, that was the most important thing about the Reformation -- the fact that ordinary people could read God's Word and hear it read in their own languages if they were illiterate.

Jan Hus of Bohemia / Czechoslovakia was another very important figure. And on and on and on. It was not just about one man. Luther's experience and work were outstanding, but it was a move of GOD, not man. :)

This post was edited on Nov 01, 2017 05:10 PM

re: Happy 500 anniversary!


what do you think life would be like today without the Reformation?
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I didn't answer this, did I. :)

I really can't imagine what life would be like today without the Reformation. The Lord definitely moved in history in a very timely manner. People were living in such spiritual darkness because the Truth of God's Word was withheld from them. Traditions of men prevailed in a warped entity called "the church".

A lot of people think all Christians believed in the Roman Catholic religious system from ???. (Not sure when they think that began, because it was not so in New Testament days. That is the picture of the True Original Church.)

But there were Christians from the early days on who did not believe in the many RC beliefs which are not Biblical, for which there is no scriptural support. This is not meant to be divisive, simply to state the truth about this issue.

If one really wants an in-depth presentation of RC beliefs (and practices, including of early and later popes), the book A Woman Rides the Beast by Dave Hunt is thoroughly researched and well-written.

This post was edited on Nov 01, 2017 04:31 PM

re: Happy 500 anniversary!

You know I keep hearing what Roman Catholics believe stated by people who are not RC, and I decided instead I was going to go to the source. I've been listening to Catholic radio, and reading some Catholic literature. We Protestants don't always portray their beliefs properly. I certainly still have areas of disagreement, but I really have appreciated hearing from actual Catholics what they believe about important areas such as salvation. I am convinced no denomination has it all right.

As far as the reformation, it certainly changed the world. And at times, it got awfully ugly and way too many people lost their lives. I can't understand how the reformers, who suffered for their beliefs, turned around and persecuted others, because their belief of baptism was different.

re: Happy 500 anniversary!

Our church had a beautiful celebration on Sunday, with a review of the 5 Solas, a choir, and a special time of worship.

We live in a very Catholic region - St. ____ and have many Catholic friends in our homeschool community. We don't see eye to eye on many theological points but we love each other!

Where would we be without the reformation? I don't know, but I know that God would not let the gospel die (there's a scripture reference for that...can't recall right now).

re: Happy 500 anniversary!

DH is Catholic. I went to his church for years. I was shocked at how similar Protestant teaching and current day Catholicism is similar. I was expecting a great divide.

re: Happy 500 anniversary!

I'm not surprised, lol, the protestants ran out the front door of the Catholic church and ran a big circle around to the back door and entered there.

This is a great opportunity to really read and learn about the reformation, so many have never read Luther, but only read about Luther, who was not a protestant btw, through a protestant lens.

The 95 thesis is not what Luther's life work was all about, it is a minor blip, it is the stuff that happened later that did so much more to reform the church back to the Biblical church.

re: Happy 500 anniversary!


I keep hearing what Roman Catholics believe stated by people who are not RC, and I decided instead I was going to go to the source.
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I really didn't think very much about this -- knew very little, except that RC's couldn't eat meat on Fridays while I was growing up (I had a number of RC friends in school) -- until a dear RC friend in my HS group and I had an in-depth discussion about RC beliefs one day.

She explained all the main beliefs to me, and I was frankly shocked because there is no Biblical support for them. We did not argue; I just asked questions about them. She and I are still dear friends today.

After that, I learned TONS more from a former RC priest of several decades, Richard Bennett. He has a great website which explains pretty much everything. He shows how RC beliefs differ from the Bible, with many Scriptural references. There is also much info there about the popes, including the shocking corruption among popes from the earliest years on. I highly recommend his website.

It was only recently that I discovered and read the book which was co-authored by Dave Hunt. He gave much more in-depth info about the popes. I have wondered if RC's know about that.



I really have appreciated hearing from actual Catholics what they believe about important areas such as salvation. I am convinced no denomination has it all right.
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To RC's, their religion is not a denomination. They consider all Protestant groups to be denominations. I have not seen anything in the Bible which says that "baptizing" infants gives them salvation. Only believers' baptism. Or that other RC sacraments are able to bring salvation to anyone.

Martin Luther was originally moved to study the Bible intently because the practice of selling indulgences (effecting release of loved ones from "Purgatory" -- not a Biblical teaching) was done for the purpose of making the RC's richer while ordinary people living in poverty grew poorer.

That false teaching also caused them much unwarranted anguish about their babies who had died before they could be "baptized". From there the Lord led him to many more Scriptures which showed him how far RC's had strayed from the true Word of God.



As far as the reformation, it certainly changed the world. And at times, it got awfully ugly and way too many people lost their lives. I can't understand how the reformers, who suffered for their beliefs, turned around and persecuted others, because their belief of baptism was different.
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I agree that NONE of them should have ever persecuted those who did not believe as they did.





DH is Catholic. I went to his church for years. I was shocked at how similar Protestant teaching and current day Catholicism is similar. I was expecting a great divide.
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What Protestant teaching are you referring to? I don't know any Protestants who pray to Mary, the "saints", who believe she ascended to Heaven as Christ Jesus did (instead of dying like other people), who believe she was/is a perpetual virgin who never had other children by Joseph, who revere the Pope as God's Representative on earth, who believe that babies are saved by being "baptized", etc, etc, etc. But I realize there might be some Protestant denominations who believe those things, and/or other RC teachings?




I'm not surprised, lol, the protestants ran out the front door of the Catholic church and ran a big circle around to the back door and entered there.
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Where have you observed this, Lizbeth? Again, I'm not assuming this hasn't happened. I've just never been in a church or fellowshipped with Protestants in other settings where this has happened.



This is a great opportunity to really read and learn about the reformation, so many have never read Luther, but only read about Luther, who was not a protestant btw, through a protestant lens.
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If Luther was not a Protestant, what was he? He did begin as a Catholic monk -- trying very very hard for a long long time to achieve salvation by works, but failing miserably, having no peace whatsoever, which led to his searching of the Scriptures and God's great revelation of Truth -- but the RC put him out when he would not recant his Scriptural beliefs, and would have killed him if they could. He married an ex-nun and they did not continue with RC's.

BTW, I love what he said to the RC leaders after having 24 hours in prison to consider whether he would recant those beliefs, or not. He said that if they could prove that his beliefs were not Scriptural, he would recant them. Instead of them being honest and searching the Scriptures about those issues, they wanted to kill him.



The 95 thesis is not what Luther's life work was all about, it is a minor blip, it is the stuff that happened later that did so much more to reform the church back to the Biblical church.
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I agree with this to a point. His list was an invitation to other RC leaders/scholars to meet with him to discuss those 95 issues. They were written in Latin, a language lay people did not know.

Someone else took the list and translated it into the language of the ordinary people, then posted that on the church door at Wittenburg. THAT''s what began the ruckus, as the list spread very quickly throughout surrounding areas. But that was not Luther's intent. It was God's intent. :)

ITA that many other things happened, including the Lord raising up other Godly men from other countries, that did much more to bring reformation (repentance and return to His Word as the Standard of Truth) to Europe, and eventually to the world. But Biblical reformation did not come to the RC. It could have, but they would not have it so.

Martin Luther served as a catalyst to bring willing people back to the Word of God, thus the Gospel (or to it, if they had never been able to read or hear it before in their own language). He was an imperfect man, but God used him in an amazing way for His own purpose.

ETA: I learned yesterday that Luther was aghast when churches began calling themselves "Lutheran" (and by other Reformers' names). AFAIK, no church groups were named for Tyndale or Hus?




This post was edited on Nov 01, 2017 05:52 PM

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