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Excellence in writing vs writing strands

re: Excellence in writing vs writing strands

In my comparison, Writing Strands lends itself better to the natural, more creative writer where IEW helps the non-writer by giving them models and methods to follow.

IEW, to some, may stifle a dc's creativity, but on the other hand, it has given confidence to those who struggle with writing by using good models. Not to say it shouldn't be used for the natural writer, as I know many who have had much success with it as well.

Writing Strands, imho, allows for the dc to show more of him/herself in his/her writing. While there are specific assignments, they give the dc ample room to be creative.

They both do a great job in terms of formatting and teaching the dc how to organize their writing.

We have used both. We used IEW for approximately one year with one ds (then 11, now 13). He gained a lot of wonderful skills (i.e. keyword outlines, using descriptive adverbs and adjectives) that he still applies in his written narrations two years later. He and I both found it too tedious for the long-haul though.

We tried Writing Strands... twice. I really wanted it to work, but too many times this same ds had writer's block. He would become frustrated with the assignments. ("Why do I have to write about ___?")

My 2 cents,
Angela :)

This post was edited on Sep 11, 2010 09:51 AM

re: Excellence in writing vs writing strands

Angela, thanks for taking the time to type all of that out. That was kind of what I was wondering from Ellie's previous posts that I mentioned. So, for me, one child would like Writing Strands and the other child would do better with IEW. :-/ At least WS is cheap.

re: Excellence in writing vs writing strands

Why not both? While there are some things that have to be learned by ALL students to be able to put out a decent paper, writing seems to be a very individualized thing based on a person's style, kwim? Since IEW and WS are so very different in style, why not do a year of one, and then a year of the other to get a balance and see which way that particular kid works best?

We've done both here. My oldest tends to be more creative and can work wonders with a blank sheet of paper. She LOVED Mr. Pudewa and the way he taught in the IEW class she took one month a couple of years. WS bores her to death. But my 2nd dd who's very much a follower will either just copy what her sister does w/o really knowing what she's doing, and therefore needs to have something more incremental to work with in order to actually LEARN.

I'd love to see the chart y'all are talking about, but in the meantime, I just did a quick google and found the following links which may or may not be helpful... not as good as a side-by-side chart, for sure!

http://www.home-school-curriculum-advisor.com/home-school-writing-curriculum.html

http://homeschoolwriters.com/resources.aspx#ctl00_IWS_WH_CPH_Content_LMTControl1

http://www.cathyduffyreviews.com/grammar-composition/writing-strands.htm

http://www.successful-homeschooling.com/institute-for-excellence-in-writing.html

http://www.successful-homeschooling.com/writing-strands.html

re: Excellence in writing vs writing strands

Why not both? While there are some things that have to be learned by ALL students to be able to put out a decent paper, writing seems to be a very individualized thing based on a person's style, kwim? Since IEW and WS are so very different in style, why not do a year of one, and then a year of the other to get a balance and see which way that particular kid works best?
******************

Now why didn't I think of that?

re: Excellence in writing vs writing strands

"In my comparison, Writing Strands lends itself better to the natural, more creative writer where IEW helps the non-writer by giving them models and methods to follow."
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LOL, we were typing at the same time, and I see that we came to opposite conclusions about which program is best for which type of writer! But we came to the same conclusion about using both, or IEW for one child and WS for another.

I see what you mean, though, about IEW being able to help the non-writer in some ways. While my very creative, loves-to-write and writes-all-the-time dd loved IEW and hated WS, I think what you're getting at is the fact that Mr. Pudewa teaches the key word outlining method. This is a method that's often used in teaching one how to study the Bible. I personally don't are for it, because it assumes that you know nothing and are therefore building conclusions from what's already written. To me, that's like directing you to "interpret it this way, and this way only". It eliminates culture and context (includes context from THAT passage that you're specifically working on at the time, but not the rest of scripture or history or whatever story you're working on. It confines it to one particular passage. I know a lot of the classical folks like key word outlining, but I'm not sure I do. I don't see it as being very individualized.


"IEW, to some, may stifle a dc's creativity, but on the other hand, it has given confidence to those who struggle with writing by using good models."
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Yes, I can clearly see that based on my last paragraph above.

In hindsight, I think part of the reason my creative dd probably liked IEW was the teacher himself. He's funny and personable. She responds well to people like that and wants to please them.


"Writing Strands, imho, allows for the dc to show more of him/herself in his/her writing. While there are specific assignments, they give the dc ample room to be creative. "
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Yep, I can see this, too. The *instructions* for WS are scripted, which is helpful for kids like my 2nd dd who need very specific instructions. But the product that the student puts out is more individualized. Thus, she has to work harder to come up with her own product. I saw the same thing when she was doing PLL and ILL... they made her *think*, whereas doing Abeka workbooks are easy because she just fills in the blanks and hurries through it.

re: Excellence in writing vs writing strands

Does writing strands teach outlining? My son REALLY lacks this.

re: Excellence in writing vs writing strands

Writing Strands teaches organizational skills incrementally (bit by bit, over time), and outlining would be part of this, so yes. He uses a different technique than Mr. Pudewa does, though, so it won't look the same as IEW's way of doing it.

If outlining is a primary concern right now, though, you might consider the Remedia outlining books. Both of my girls have used that, and they taught outlining skills very simply.

http://www.christianbook.com/Christian/Books/easy_find?Ntt=remedia+outlining&N=0&Ntk=keywords&action=Search&Ne=0&event=ESRCN&nav_search=1&cms=1

This post was edited on Sep 11, 2010 11:04 AM

re: Excellence in writing vs writing strands

I didn't care for Writing Strands becaues of how it speaks to the child. At least in the book I had. There was this attitude of parents are dumb and you know how "they" can be (referring to parents). Just didn't care for that attitude at all.

We have IEW and will start it in the next couple of weeks. I'm sure we'll love it. We love his Phonetic Zoo and poetry memorization.

Praising Him,
Kim
www.blessed2bamommy.com

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