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NPR Article "Slow Teaching"

NPR Article "Slow Teaching"

https://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2018/02/01/581864513/would-college-students-retain-more-if-professors-dialed-back-the-pace?utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20180201

I enjoyed this article, despite the evolution references. It solidifies my opinions on many aspects of the Charlotte Mason approach. Encouraged me to start another family read aloud.

re: NPR Article "Slow Teaching"

Yes, it explains why talking the book through with someone as you read helps too!!!

re: NPR Article "Slow Teaching"

Reminds me of an article some one posted a long time ago here called "learn more, by doing less".

Thanks for sharing!

re: NPR Article "Slow Teaching"


Years ago when I first went online and discovered h/s discussion boards, lots of people used a certain curriculum published for Christian school classrooms, which was fine if that worked well for their families.

We tried it, but it was soooo fast-paced, soooo rushed, it was way too much for my dc. At first I felt bad about that, but then I realized, What's The Rush??? The curriculum we were using came out at the very same place, just at a different, much more relaxed pace.

re: NPR Article "Slow Teaching"

I've known this intuitively since I was only an elementary student, myself; and was able to put it into practise in my own classroom, and home school, as well.

On a related note, it also points out the problem with rushing students into "kindergarten" at age 3 or 4; and rushing students into college when they're not even done with high school.

I agree: What's The Rush?

re: NPR Article "Slow Teaching"

I would agree, but this thought should be started in K-12! The rush of learning at the expense of basics, only to cram in more earlier and earlier in an effort for all to go to college is insanity. This has always made sense to me. We are not "hurry-uppers" here, nor crammers, but enjoying the process.

Quality is always better over quantity, IMO.

This post was edited on Feb 06, 2018 08:56 AM

re: NPR Article "Slow Teaching"

Well in regards to college, so much of it is just a repeat of high school. Especially nowadays when high schools are pushing pushing AP courses, here in our state you literally cannot get into a regular university let alone the research universities without some AP classes.

Early community college is a great choice because you save a lot of money and it's a nice experience. Community college classes are small, teachers know your name, and the cost is less than what I would have paid for online classes through TPS/Abeka/BJU basically any high quality online/distance learning option is more than I'm paying not to mention we are saving 65,000.00 on those two years they would have been at college.

:)

But, the kid has to be ready and willing, and you have to have good community colleges nearby. I know some places where the CC's are pretty undesirable. Here, they are amazing. :)

This post was edited on Feb 13, 2018 02:42 PM

re: NPR Article "Slow Teaching"

Well in regards to college, so much of it is just a repeat of high school. Especially nowadays when high schools are pushing pushing AP courses, here in our state you literally cannot get into a regular university let alone the research universities without some AP classes.

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I completely agree with this. While I don’t believe in rushing, I also very much don’t believe in wasting time - both mine and my kids’. So much of early college is a repeat of high school, and it makes no sense to me whatsoever to have them do it twice, just to avoid “rushing” them.

But I also agree that they need to be ready.

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