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re: re: how does proving work in math benefit life skills in the future?

re: re: how does proving work in math benefit life skills in the future?

it certainly helps us see if and where we made a mistake.
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Here's a real example from my morning. I followed the road and ended up on the interstate without knowing it. Now, I can look at google maps and see where I made a mistake. Next time I'm at the riverside, I can use the correct steps and get home via the route I intended. I did get home, just not how I expected.

I'm wondering if there is some kind of inside joke going on with this question as if it's more about the physical writing down of something versus the thinking process.

re: re: how does proving work in math benefit life skills in the future?

These are good talking points and ideas as to why we teach our kids to think methodically. I get the feeling this proofing math skill has to have future benefits that flow into other areas that are needed in life beyond homeschool. Everyone has me thinking and is on target with the conversation. Cbollin has confirmed my thinking that there is a reasoning behind the task. It's not just for the drudgery. I hadn't thought about taxes, billing, and even a map.

re: re: how does proving work in math benefit life skills in the future?

My DH just told me he had to give his professors his math papers with the problems solved or points were taken away or they think you cheated, etc. We are trying to think of areas where else the practice of writing things out and thinking things out is used in our day to day lives into adulthood.

Y'all are making me laugh, too. ;)

This post was edited on Oct 20, 2017 11:34 AM

re: re: re: how does proving work in math benefit life skills in the future?

We are trying to think of areas where else the practice of writing things out and thinking things out is used in our day to day lives into adulthood.
************

I just went to salvation army store. I got a receipt. it shows in writing (although a computer based register did the work) the process of
price of item
minus the 50% discount for being the color of the day tag
plus the amount of sales tax
the amount I gave in cash
and my change.


After thanking God for the right item for our needs (size, color, etc) and getting the benefit of it being the tag that was half discount, I thought of this thread and said to myself, is this what the original poster is looking for?


ETA: and I reconciled a bank statement today and it was helpful to show my steps.....

This post was edited on Oct 20, 2017 07:06 PM

re: re: re: how does proving work in math benefit life skills in the future?

Lol! Glad I read this thread! I needed to laugh!

I liked the examples that cbollin brought out, and what lizbeth said...

"That applies to everything in life, how can we ever improve performance or relationships if we don't ever step back and look at the decisions made along the way that got us to this point."


Quite true.

re: re: re: how does proving work in math benefit life skills in the future?

I agree w/ the others that it's a great "trail" for the process.

I never required them to have aaaalll the same steps as the AK, because, honestly, a lot of times there were many that could have been combined. I looked at the work when the answer was wrong to see where they goofed. This allowed me to know how and where to help. IOW, if it was a process problem vs a foundational problem (like knowing their facts), or even just a copying problem.

The other point I always brought up was that right now, it might not be hard to remember all those numbers and/or symbols, but as we progressed in math, it was going to get much, much harder to remember and keep it all straight in his head. By jotting down a few steps or notes, he wouldn't have to keep all that info in his head. He would then be able to focus on the problem, and not all the details.

So, if he's working on a multi-step project for work, having a few notes/steps jotted down helps him/her. It's a lot easier to keep appointments or deadlines, if you've written them down somewhere. Or, if you're working in a group, and you're the leader, having some notes jotted down about who's doing what and maybe some of their information, they can better oversee the project.

Or, what about those rare circumstances that you get sick or something happens and you need to have someone else take over that project. If you have a few notes, you can fill them in, or they can at least have a good idea as to what is happening to step in.

K

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