Homeschooling Discussions


Reply to topic

Search

Music Curriculum

Music Curriculum

Whether you currently do or are interested in incorporating music in your homeschool program, what do you look for in a curriculum? Do you prefer learning materials in the form of workbook/worksheets or would you prefer something done mostly online? Is a combination of online interactive lessons with a teacher and downloadable worksheets appealing? Ideas, thought, preferences? If you could custom pick how your child experiences a music class while at home, what would you choose?

re: Music Curriculum

I prefer self-teaching materials that let us actually do music in our home. Examples: piano books that basically teach everything so the parent doesn't have to know much about music, or other instrument books with similar type of instruction.

I want my kids to actually participate in music, rather than doing worksheets or lessons about music.

But I also have a music background, and I know that a lot of parents don't, so I may be in the minority.

re: Music Curriculum

I prefer live performances and a hands on approach.

When they are small we give them lots of instruments to play with. We read Meet the Orchestra, read and listened to The Story of the Orchestra, and then watched a live performance of the Finger Lakes Orchestra at a theatre as they taught and performed some of the concepts introduced in the book. We are blessed to have a School-time performance program at a theatre within driving distance. This year they are doing a show on the Opera.

We listened to the many CDs that came with our curriculum on the life and music of different composers. My children also take piano lessons and have dabbled with guitar and violin.

My youngest can't wait to be able to start taking piano lessons, so I have taught him the little bit I remember and he has been moving through the younger piano books on his own from what he knows so far. I think Little Einsteins had a huge influence on him. He once heard classical music in an elevator and said,"That's my song!" LOL and he hummed along. He also loves looking through the instrument books and can name all the different woodwinds instruments. Little ones really are sponges if you nurture their interests.

My older kids also dabble in Garage Band and create their own music using a drum machine, too, but that had nothing to do with me.

They've gotten all their music theory from their piano teacher.

re: Music Curriculum

The hands-on, practical component cannot be under emphasized, Suzuki based his entire method on it, just an example.

re: Music Curriculum

Coming back to add that the only "curriculum" that I ever purchased for studying music was "Beethoven Who?".
There are many links so a you learn about a particular style of music, you can listen to it, too.
We never got around to incorporating it in with all our other studies, but this is what I did buy since you asked what would you choose.
http://www.marciawashburn.com/BeethovenWho.html
It's also sold as a CD from Rainbow Resource, but I purchased the download from the author.

re: Music Curriculum

Thank you all so much for your input! So would you say that learning an instrument is paramount? What if you aren't necessarily interested in having your child learn an instrument (organized lessons)? would drums, wooden block, a recorder, etc. suffice? And thank you for the links you have posted.

re: Music Curriculum

If you aren't interested in having your children learn an instrument I would focus on music appreciation (listening to music) and music history. If you are interested in them learning to read music you could do it through singing.

Listening to music is like a young child listening to their parents talk. Learning to play an instrument, or sing in tune, is learning to speak in the language of music. Composition is the learning of making or writing music.

If you want a basic music education I would focus on listening to music. For example, you could listen to Bach and read some about his life. If you want music history it is a history lesson in itself. As music changed so did our western culture. The study of the different types of music from 1500 - present is eye opening!

If you want them to learn to read music choir or hymn music would be a great avenue to do so without having to learn an instrument; our voices are an instrument. If you don't read music yourself you could sing along with a song you like playing on a CD or a phone or whatever you use to play music.

I taught music for 8 years prior to homeschooling so I am teaching my children piano, music theory, and singing.

HTH

This post was edited on Sep 04, 2017 05:41 PM

re: Music Curriculum

We used this one year. We would watch the seminars and take notes on them. The first 4 or 5 out of 10 are the best (especially the first 3). Worth watching, if you're interested in music and music history.
(Not the best for young students, but great for preteen and teenagers.)

https://www.shepcall.com/the-distraction-dilemma/

There's also a short overview of it, if you'd like to watch that first:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ki3-VcoEkfY


Disclaimer: A LOT (all most all) of this guy's material is great, but he is a Seventh Day Adventist, and he does bring some of his doctrine into his seminars. Just be careful, "chew the meat, and spit out the bones".

This post was edited on Sep 05, 2017 07:30 AM

12

Reply to topic

Search


Return to Homeschooling Discussions