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re: re: re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL with a question for cbollin on page 5

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

Here are some sites that may help you plan -->

http://www.thinkinenglish.org/
https://www.fluentland.com/
http://www.allthingsgrammar.com/
http://materialsenglish.com/
http://www.exercisesenglish.com/
http://vocabularyhome.com/
http://www.engames.eu/


This place might help you plan.
https://www.englishclass101.com/
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeTVoczn9NOZA9blls3YgUg

Here's just one of many examples of books read on Youtube; you'll find books at many different reading levels. Really, you will find a LOT on Youtube! :)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o4ckVIfJ1EE

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

usingenglish.com and eslcafe.com are some other useful sites.

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

Thanks!!!

What did you (or your dh) use when you taught ESL? What do you know works?
Did/do you teach adults or children or both? Young people or older folk? What is your approach? What does a lesson or study hour consist of? How many times a week did/does each student get lessons?

Hope you don't mind me asking so many questions! I'm trying to learn what I can about this topic from others with experience. :)

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

What did you (or your dh) use when you taught ESL? What do you know works?
Did/do you teach adults or children or both? Young people or older folk? What is your approach? What does a lesson or study hour consist of? How many times a week did/does each student get lessons?

Hope you don't mind me asking so many questions! I'm trying to learn what I can about this topic from others with experience. :)


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No problem at all! I'm the type to ask a lot of questions when I'm figuring something out, also! It's the only way, right? :o)

We taught (teach, in my husband's case) :) primarily on the college level, so we were using the supplied texts and workbooks that the dept. wanted/wants to use. College ESL classes are usually 2 or 3 days per week, either an hour or two.

On the elem. or high school level, daily is ideal, if possible, obviously, especially so they can get plenty of practise. (Adult ESL learners in the States are in a de facto "immersion program" because they're in an English-speaking country and MUST listen to/speak in the target language daily. Kwim?) :)

I've also supplemented my (college-supplied) texts with the Handbook for Reading, it's that good, in my opinion. Phonics pathways would get the job done, too, but it's a bigger volume, and personally, I just find Abeka's works as well in a more direct and simple style. That's just me, of course. :)

I'll come back to this post later in the day to give a brief run-down of the basics of the phonics method, because in a nutshell, that's all that's essentially needed, that and speaking and listening and reading.

(In a way, you could compare it to the piano. once you know the notes and how to manage your hands and the keyboard, you just really need to start playing, A LOT, daily.) :)

This post was edited on Jul 24, 2017 09:39 PM

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

Learning to read via the traditional phonics approach begins with learning the (5) short vowel sounds. ABeka teaches them as a as in apple, e as in elephant, i as in inchworm, o as in ostrich, u as in umbrella.

Next the student learns the remaining letters of the alphabet -- the consonants -- and their sounds. ABeka teaches them as t/table, l/lamp, b/bell, n/nest, m/milk, h/horse, s/sun, c/cat, d/dog, g/goat, r/ring, f/fox, j/jar, k/kite, v/violin, w/wagon, y/yarn, p/pig, z/zebra, q(with u)/queen [because in our alphabet, the q is always the /qu/ sound -- quilt, queen, quiver, quickly, etc.], and x/fox, box, ax.

Thirdly the student begins learning to blend, beginning with very simple consonant and vowel blends, on a "blend ladder," such as sa, se, si, so, su.

Fourthly the student learns to sound simple one vowel words, which is a matter of just adding a consonant to the end of a blend, such as /sa/ with /t/ is sat; /bi/ with /b/ is bib; etc. with the one vowel rule, that when there is one vowel only in a word, it usually says its short sound.

Fifthly the student learns the long vowel sounds (a/acorn, e/eagle, i/icecream, o/open [picture of open door], u/uniform); and the student learns the rule that when there are two vowels in a word, the FIRST says its LONG sound, and the SECOND is SILENT. That makes it very easy to read a word like "team" or "cute."

Lastly, the student learns all the "special phonics sounds" such as bl/block, ear/bear, cr/crab, gl/glue, str/stream, etc.

There are a few sight words, of course, which defy phonics "rules," and these are taught, such as "the" and "a."

It's an effective and simple program! :)

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

Hi!
Thank you, Mommy4Jesus, for sharing so much in this thread already. I wanted to give a little update and ask your advice. :)

I have been teaching the fore mentioned family now. This is the second week. The books are on the way, but I they were ready to start lessons, so I went ahead and started.
I divided the students into two groups - older ones and younger ones (two different levels), I try to teach both groups twice a week.
I started both groups with Body parts - eyes, ears, nose, etc. Recently, I taught the older group the meaning of verb, noun, adjective, and pronoun. I gave them the following homework assignment: write 5 verbs, 5, nouns, 5 adjectives, 5 pronouns, and 5 sentences of their choice.

Anyway… I guess it’s going okay. Of course, it’s challenging, but that’s part of being a teacher. :) It’s the first time of done lessons through Skype. Have you done that? Any suggestions?

The advice I wanted to ask is regarding another student I have. I just gave her a lesson for the first time. She just started 4th grade, and did her first test, and flunked it. So we spent the whole lesson seriously learning the material in that test. It was pretty simple (the usage of the verbs am, is, are, etc, and pronouns, and five vocab. words), but she had no CLUE. She only guessed at the answers. I told my dad about the situation, and said she needs an INTENSIVE English course.
My dad suggested that she should have lessons at least three times a week, and just scrap the school textbook, and find what level she’s really at, and lay a solid foundation, and then build on it. Now, I think this is good advice, but on a very practical level, where do start? How do I start? And how do I go from there?
Another hurdle is that her family doesn’t live very near us, so I wouldn’t be able to go their three times a week (my schedule wouldn’t allow it either). So it might work out to go there once a week for an hour and a half or two hours, and then do two lessons a week via Skype…

Any suggestions or help you could offer would be appreciated. :)

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

As long as she is willing to do three lessons a week, two of those being via Skype, that's what I'd do, too. It does indeed sound like she needs an intensive English foundation! :)

And, no, I haven't taught that way, but I've been a student that way (not Skype per se, but online courses), and learned very well. It sounds doable! You're such a blessing to this family.

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

Okay, but how? How do I start? And where (how) do I go from there?

This post was edited on Sep 20, 2017 03:04 PM

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