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re: re: re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL with a question for cbollin on page 5

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

Thanks! What is the difference between the two books?
Would I need the teacher's edition, too, if I get Abeka's Handbook for Reading?

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

No, you wouldn't necessarily have to have the teacher's edition.

ABeka's is full color, while Phonics Pathways is black & white. ABeka's is also part of a complete curriculum for phonics/language learning (though can be used on its own), while Phonics Pathways is the program, in and of itself.
ABeka is a Christian program, whereas PP is secular.
There are also some slight differences in scope and pacing, but they are not vast.
They also would work as excellent supplements to any other phonics-based program.

I'm partial to ABeka and think it is better, but for any number of reasons, if someone couldn't use it, PP would also work.

I have both on my bookshelf! :) They're just as good bought in used condition as new -- because they're not consumables. :)

There are sample pages at christianbook.com.

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

http://homeschoolreviews.com/forums/1/thread.aspx?id=130765



Hi Thinker,
The third post on page 2 of the above linked post, written by "titus2," shares a very simple and effective way to teach reading using ABeka's Handbook for Reading.

:)

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

Thanks for the note about Titus2's post! That DOES seem to be a
good approach.

I am wondering about using CLE. I'm sure it could work, but perhaps there is something better out there that will do (teach) the same job, and be less burdensome. KWIM? Any ideas or advice?

Also, I wrote earlier...
I think that I should make two study groups, 1) the dad and the oldest four who know more English, and 2) the younger children.
I think I could teach the 1st group using the CLE paces, but I don't know about the younger ones even having enough English ability to understand the directions in the book or even my directions, especially at first. So I think I should probably do something simpler with them first, until they get up to the CLE grade 1 level. ***Do you think this approach would work? What could I use for the younger ones?***

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

I am wondering about using CLE. I'm sure it could work, but perhaps there is something better out there that will do (teach) the same job, and be less burdensome. KWIM? Any ideas or advice?

Also, I wrote earlier...
I think that I should make two study groups, 1) the dad and the oldest four who know more English, and 2) the younger children.
I think I could teach the 1st group using the CLE paces, but I don't know about the younger ones even having enough English ability to understand the directions in the book or even my directions, especially at first. So I think I should probably do something simpler with them first, until they get up to the CLE grade 1 level. ***Do you think this approach would work? What could I use for the younger ones?***



----



Well...I share your assessment of CLE as being potentially more burdensome than some other approaches. (Is there any particular reason the Dad wants CLE? Maybe it's simply that that's all he knows well? If so, he might be open to a different curriculum.)

Personally, I'd prefer to teach using ABeka. It could be used a la titus2's post, or a little bit more involved by working in an Abeka workbook, as well. Either way would work.

My second choice would be Phonics Pathways.

As for dividing them into two groups, I like your idea and think it makes sense. It's practical and reasonable. :)

Regarding the younger ones who barely speak any English, don't worry, just start in the very beginning with ABeka would be my suggestion. You'd begin with the short vowel sounds (a as in apple, e as in elephant, etc.)

Now were you meaning, how to communicate with folks who don't speak English? (And I'm assuming you don't speak their language?) I've done that, too :) but I wasn't sure if that's what you mean.

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

Well...I share your assessment of CLE as being potentially more burdensome than some other approaches. (Is there any particular reason the Dad wants CLE? Maybe it's simply that that's all he knows well? If so, he might be open to a different curriculum.)

-----

The dad chose CLE because that's what we used, and he knew it was an English curriculum for native speakers. He probably would be open to another curriculum - CLE is basically just the only one he's seen. (And he knows it's 10 paces a year.)
He asked me how many years it would take before his children could do them on their own. I answered that American children can by about 4th or 5th grade, so his children might be able to by about 6th or 7th. He seemed okay with that answer.

I did administer the level 200 diagnostic test for the three girls. Their results were 92, 76, and 64 correct answers.
CLE states, "If the student has 70 or more correct answers, he should be ready for Level 300."

I'm not very familiar with Abeka. What books would you start with, or how would you start teaching students that are at this level? They already know how to read. Of course, they need a lot of help with pronunciation and adding to their vocabulary takes time... but what level do you suggest starting with, both in ABeka and CLE?

You said, "Personally, I'd prefer to teach using ABeka. It could be used a la titus2's post, or a little bit more involved by working in an Abeka workbook, as well. Either way would work."

Do you think the Titus2 way would be a good way to start with the younger ones?

You asked, "Now were you meaning, how to communicate with folks who don't speak English? (And I'm assuming you don't speak their language?) I've done that, too :) but I wasn't sure if that's what you mean."
-- Sorry, I don't know what I could have been talking about! LOL

Thanks for all the answers and effort you are putting into answering my questions! I really appreciate it!

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL



I did administer the level 200 diagnostic test for the three girls. Their results were 92, 76, and 64 correct answers.
CLE states, "If the student has 70 or more correct answers, he should be ready for Level 300."

>>>So, it would seem you have two there who are ready for Level 300, and one who might or might not be able to be brought up to speed. That's something you can tell by interacting with her, though. So I won't presume to know for sure, from this distance.<<< :)

I'm not very familiar with Abeka. What books would you start with, or how would you start teaching students that are at this level? They already know how to read. Of course, they need a lot of help with pronunciation and adding to their vocabulary takes time... but what level do you suggest starting with, both in ABeka and CLE?

>>>What almost any ESL program does is to administer a test for placement, for the very reason you're asking, to determine where a student is in his understanding and use of the language. It's very difficult for me to say for sure, since I'm not speaking with them. If you're planning to use CLE, then their placement test will be a good baseline. If you're planning to use ABeka, you could do several things. You could have them take a phonics test from the test packet, and see how they can do with that. (They are very simple, brief tests.) You could have them read from the Handbook for Reading, and use that as a gauge. And what you do with them will also depend on what their dad wants. If he wants a complete English program, including grammar and writing, then obviously you'll plan to teach differently than if you're just teaching them to read and speak English.<<<

You said, "Personally, I'd prefer to teach using ABeka. It could be used a la titus2's post, or a little bit more involved by working in an Abeka workbook, as well. Either way would work."

Do you think the Titus2 way would be a good way to start with the younger ones?

>>>Those younger three who don't speak as well as their older siblings and their dad? Those are the ones you mean? If so, yes, I do think that would work, also.<<<

You asked, "Now were you meaning, how to communicate with folks who don't speak English? (And I'm assuming you don't speak their language?) I've done that, too :) but I wasn't sure if that's what you mean."
-- Sorry, I don't know what I could have been talking about! LOL

>>>You'd mentioned, "but I don't know about the younger ones even having enough English ability to understand the directions in the book or even my directions, especially at first. " That was what I was unclear about. Oops, sorry!<<< :)

Thanks for all the answers and effort you are putting into answering my questions! I really appreciate it!

>>>Awww, you're very welcome! :) This is a helpful site, and I know there have been those times I had questions and was helped by others. It's my pleasure.<<<

I'll come back later with some sites you might want to read and browse. :)

re: re: CLE Language Arts and TESOL

Thanks! I'm looking forward to the sites!

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